iammorethanmemory:

A bit of sunshine to brighten your day

iammorethanmemory:

A bit of sunshine to brighten your day

2,245 notes

Quit smiling, you’re supposed to be a professional.

(Source: awbuckyno)

13,546 notes

kylesbishop:

lesmizbwayTonight. #15secondinterview. @andymientus. You’re welcome, internet. [x]

774 notes

blackumi:

kim-jong-chill:

what a difference 50 years can make

or not

Old fashioned racism, current technology.

67,252 notes

david-tennants-little-fangirl:

To all the people starting school this week

image

38,020 notes

humansofnewyork:

"His grandmother and I are raising him. I worry about putting him into the public school system. I was a teacher for many years. I’ve seen so much confidence destroyed by the standardized system. Every human is born with natural curiosity. I’ve never seen a child who wasn’t inspired. But once you force someone to do anything, the inspired person is killed. I dropped out of school myself in 7th grade. So I know. I taught a GED course for years, so I’ve seen the end results over and over. I’ve seen so many kids who have complexes and insecurities because they were forced to do something they weren’t ready to do, and then they were blamed when they weren’t able to do it. What we call ‘education’ today is not organic. You can’t take something as complex as the human mind, compartmentalize it, and regiment its development so strictly."

humansofnewyork:

"His grandmother and I are raising him. I worry about putting him into the public school system. I was a teacher for many years. I’ve seen so much confidence destroyed by the standardized system. Every human is born with natural curiosity. I’ve never seen a child who wasn’t inspired. But once you force someone to do anything, the inspired person is killed. I dropped out of school myself in 7th grade. So I know. I taught a GED course for years, so I’ve seen the end results over and over. I’ve seen so many kids who have complexes and insecurities because they were forced to do something they weren’t ready to do, and then they were blamed when they weren’t able to do it. What we call ‘education’ today is not organic. You can’t take something as complex as the human mind, compartmentalize it, and regiment its development so strictly."

36,128 notes

humansofnewyork:

"He can tell you things that happened two or three years ago. He can tell you the five largest moons of Saturn, and the distance from the Earth to the Sun. He can recite songs word for word. But early on, we noticed that he’d get very emotional around loud noises— like a blow dryer or loud birthday parties. He’d also get overwhelmed around things in motion. He had a very bad experience in an inflatable jumper at a party. We noticed these things early, identified that he was on the autism spectrum, and got him in therapy. We’ve been working hard on it with intensive therapy from a very young age, and we’re so much better. We still have some issues, but I think we’re outgrowing the symptoms. I tell everyone who will listen: ‘Early intervention, early intervention, early intervention.’"

humansofnewyork:

"He can tell you things that happened two or three years ago. He can tell you the five largest moons of Saturn, and the distance from the Earth to the Sun. He can recite songs word for word. But early on, we noticed that he’d get very emotional around loud noises— like a blow dryer or loud birthday parties. He’d also get overwhelmed around things in motion. He had a very bad experience in an inflatable jumper at a party. We noticed these things early, identified that he was on the autism spectrum, and got him in therapy. We’ve been working hard on it with intensive therapy from a very young age, and we’re so much better. We still have some issues, but I think we’re outgrowing the symptoms. I tell everyone who will listen: ‘Early intervention, early intervention, early intervention.’"

6,427 notes

villarrr:

THIS HAS ALWAYS BEEN MY FAVORITE THING

villarrr:

THIS HAS ALWAYS BEEN MY FAVORITE THING

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)

518,747 notes

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve been a deep believer my whole life. 18 years as a Southern Baptist. More than 40 years as a mainline Protestant. I’m an ordained pastor. But it’s just stopped making sense to me. You see people doing terrible things in the name of religion, and you think: ‘Those people believe just as strongly as I do. They’re just as convinced as I am.’ And it just doesn’t make sense anymore. It doesn’t make sense to believe in a God that dabbles in people’s lives. If a plane crashes, and one person survives, everyone thanks God. They say: ‘God had a purpose for that person. God saved her for a reason!’ Do we not realize how cruel that is? Do we not realize how cruel it is to say that if God had a purpose for that person, he also had a purpose in killing everyone else on that plane? And a purpose in starving millions of children? A purpose in slavery and genocide? For every time you say that there’s a purpose behind one person’s success, you invalidate billions of people. You say there is a purpose to their suffering. And that’s just cruel."

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve been a deep believer my whole life. 18 years as a Southern Baptist. More than 40 years as a mainline Protestant. I’m an ordained pastor. But it’s just stopped making sense to me. You see people doing terrible things in the name of religion, and you think: ‘Those people believe just as strongly as I do. They’re just as convinced as I am.’ And it just doesn’t make sense anymore. It doesn’t make sense to believe in a God that dabbles in people’s lives. If a plane crashes, and one person survives, everyone thanks God. They say: ‘God had a purpose for that person. God saved her for a reason!’ Do we not realize how cruel that is? Do we not realize how cruel it is to say that if God had a purpose for that person, he also had a purpose in killing everyone else on that plane? And a purpose in starving millions of children? A purpose in slavery and genocide? For every time you say that there’s a purpose behind one person’s success, you invalidate billions of people. You say there is a purpose to their suffering. And that’s just cruel."

31,862 notes

humansofnewyork:

"In my heart of hearts, I wanted to do the right thing, but selling drugs was easy. Everyone was doing it. I mean, I’m not using that as an excuse, I made my own decisions. But I grew up around these Robin Hood figures who would sell drugs, then buy supplies for kids who were going back to school, or pay rent for an old woman who was about to get evicted. All my friends were doing it. It almost seemed fashionable. I never felt proud of it. I always thought I’d transition to a job with the Transit Authority, or a job like this— something I’d feel good about, but instead I transitioned to jail. I did six years. When I got out, it was tempting to go back to the easy money, because everyone around me was still doing it, and I couldn’t get a job. But luckily I found an agency that helps ex-cons, because there aren’t many companies looking to give people a second chance. I’ve had this job for a few years now. You know what product I’m selling now? Myself. Everyone around here is my client. Times Square is a drug to these people. And I’m picking up all the trash so that they can have the full Times Square experience."

humansofnewyork:

"In my heart of hearts, I wanted to do the right thing, but selling drugs was easy. Everyone was doing it. I mean, I’m not using that as an excuse, I made my own decisions. But I grew up around these Robin Hood figures who would sell drugs, then buy supplies for kids who were going back to school, or pay rent for an old woman who was about to get evicted. All my friends were doing it. It almost seemed fashionable. I never felt proud of it. I always thought I’d transition to a job with the Transit Authority, or a job like this— something I’d feel good about, but instead I transitioned to jail. I did six years. When I got out, it was tempting to go back to the easy money, because everyone around me was still doing it, and I couldn’t get a job. But luckily I found an agency that helps ex-cons, because there aren’t many companies looking to give people a second chance. I’ve had this job for a few years now. You know what product I’m selling now? Myself. Everyone around here is my client. Times Square is a drug to these people. And I’m picking up all the trash so that they can have the full Times Square experience."

8,362 notes